Real News and #FakeNews

After the terrorist attack which took place at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England on May 22, a satire blog, Scrappleface published a post with the following headline: Youth Issues Cry for Help from Manchester Arena. Being satire, this is obviously “fake news”.

The reason the entire post is darkly hilarious, though, is not because there is anything funny about a terrorist attack, but that what is written in satire is so close to what actually gets published from major world news outlets. Take for example, a tweet on the same subject from the New York Times asking “What Led Salman Abedi To Bomb The Manchester Arena?” (archived at Weasel Zippers). Here we go again with the predictable “unanswerable” question about what the terrorist’s motive could have possibly been. For any sane person, the answer is clear. Although the main perpetrator may have had other “issues”, there was one obvious answer as to what his guiding principles were here.

No wonder that more and more people consider the New York Times, et al., no better than silly internet satire sites, and for all the furor that has been going on about #fakenews, it really would help if these “real news” sites would stop publishing things as ridiculous than silly internet satire sites.